Marketing Your Book – Think Outside the Box

June 11, 2017

Recently, I had the honor of talking to a talented friend who is self-pubbing his book and wanted to send me a copy. I was so pleased that he’d think of me! I asked him if he planned on doing any signings, and he indicated he didn’t think there would be enough interest. Considering his topic, I took one look at the Rescue Beagles and uttered, “Poppycock!” Okay, I didn’t really say that. More like “Bullsh*t!”

See, I get cranky when an author spends countless hours writing their tomes only to admit defeat when it comes to doing the really important stuff; getting readers’ noses into the pages. In the time it takes to offer the Rescues a designer doggeh chewie, I’d thought of several out-of-the-box things he could do that would put him front and center with his core readership. I immediately disabused him of his self-defeating mindset with these ideas, and he admitted that he’d never even considered those venues.

It’s what I do on a daily basis…think outside the box.

Yes, our books are blessed to be distributed on a national basis, but that alone doesn’t guarantee sales. Readers gotta wanna read it, and this is where author participation comes in handy.

Before our authors’ books hit the shelves, we discuss the regional and not-so-regional ideas that go beyond the traditional author venues – bookstores. Signings in bookstores can be iffy propositions because you are depending on customers, whose reading tastes are varied, to be interested in your book. Obviously, the larger your author platform, the better received a bookstore signing could be. Most authors’ author platforms aren’t where they could be, so attracting a readership is tough. Even tougher if you’re doing it on your own.

Thar be considerations.

Consider Your Research

Writing professionaly isn’t for the faint of heart. You have to be tough, tough, tough, and be willing to entertain the impossible, which means your book has to have good red meat. Apologies to all vegans. How well researched is your book? Does it stand up to scrutiny? For example, I had doctors and other medical professionals writing to ask me what kind of medicine I practice. I nearly fainted with pleasure. I researched my topics for a year. A. Year. I consulted many docs. I was/am a Reiki Master. It was safe to say I knew what I was writing about.

Consider Your Readership

First step is to isolate your intended readers. For example, if your story/memoir is about ballet, then your intended readers are lovers of the ballet, or are involved directly with ballet.

Consider Your Platform

Many authors lack a large author platform, so you gotta work with what you have to get your book in front of readers. What is the golden thread that ties you to your story? It’s much easier to determine if you’ve written a memoir. But fiction writers also have a personal link to what they write. Figure out what that is. If you’re the ballet author, consider your background and life experiences and see how that will establish a core readership. The most important element is to define that golden thread that connects you to your readers, so that they say, “Yes! I’ve lived this, too!”

Consider Your Venues

Now that you’ve determined your your book has that needed red meat, defined your audience, and measured the size and legitmacy of your author platform, it’s time to figure out where to find these lovely readers. Let’s continue with the ballet author. First places I’d think of are ballet studios and ballet/shoe apparel stores. These are places that are filled to the brim with a core readership.

Many authors discover that their books don’t have a readily-definable readership. What to do? Answer: dig deeper. Let’s say your story focuses on a woman’s journey through life, and her profession is a baker. First place I’d think of for an author event is a bakery. Thar be lotsa bakeries around…even in my wee Iowa town.

What Do You Have to Offer?

Okay, you’ve done all your homework and you’re ready to approach those ballet studios or bakeries. How do that? Do you go in and beg for them to host your event? NO.

No one appreciates being asked to perform a favor. You gotta bring something to the table. You gotta take the approach of “What can I do for you?” The venue has to gain something by hosting you. Define what that is.

Using the ballet theme again, a perfect way to approach a ballet studio could be to offer a special workshop. A flat fee would buy the workshop and signed copy of the book. The studio wins. The author wins.

Let’s say your book is tougher to define in terms of a venue or audience. Don’t let that stop you! An author I know found this adorable, intimate little bar in her area. She approached the owner/manager and asked which day was his slowest. He said Tuesday. So she asked about a deal; Tuesday night, she’d do a book event. She suggested that a flat fee would buy her book and a glass of wine/beer/appetizer. Or he could simply offer discounts on Tuesday night. He was intrigued because she offered options and solutions. What did he have to lose? She made up posters and put them up on his bar windows and walls. The manager took out an ad in the paper and neighborhood flyer.

Tuesday night came, and the place filled up. She has a lively sense of humor, and received a lot of enthusiasm. Not only did the bar sell a LOT of booz and food, but she sold out of all the books she brought (50). Not a bad night.

The bar owner was so pleased that he decided to offer Tuesday nights as “Author Night,” and authors could come and give a talk. It ended up being a lucrative event for him.

I love it when a plan comes together.

But this all takes a lot of thought. And this isn’t just for self-pubbed authors. It’s for all authors. Many publishers don’t/won’t make the time or budget to extend themselves on a local level, and I think it’s a mistake. Local/regional promotion has a way of spreading out on a wider basis, because you never know who is in the audience.

If you’re talented enough to write, you’re talented enough to take your promotion into your own hands and make it work. The only time you fail to succeed is when you don’t listen to advice from experienced professionals, rely on others to maximize your success, and sit on your hands.

Go. Be daring. Be successful. Think outside the box.

 

 


%d bloggers like this: