Author Platform: Done It vs Gonna Do It

July 17, 2017

I read book proposals all day long, and one of the most important parts of the proposal is Author Platform. I need to know is how well I think an author’s book will sell, and that’s where Author Platform comes into play.

Author Platforms are a toughie to explain because everyone has different definitions for what they are. I keep it real simple.

Author Platforms are about who you are and how many people know you in the category for which you write. It’s a measurement we use when figuring out how well your book may sell. For example, if you’re known as the quilting queen among a huge group of quilters, that platform won’t help if your book is about cancer. That’s what I call a misfire. I see lots of those. Conversely, that quilting queen could probably sell a bucket load of quilting books.

Author Platforms are hard to establish and take a LOT of time. You can’t snap your fingers and bamm-o, you wake up one day with a shiny new Author Platform. It’s tons of hard work, and you have to ask yourself if you’re up to the task. Many authors insist they were born ready, which immediately sends the Rescue Beagles into a fit of wheezing laughter, because if you’ve never published before, you have no idea what a time-suck it is.

I’ve seen too many authors who simply give up when they see just how hard promoting their book is. We’ve seen authors who expected their publishers to do it all for them, and the truth is, it’s an unrealistic expectation in today’s publishing world. The world has changed.

There is so much competition for readers’ attention, let alone the media, and at the same time publishers’ publicity departments are shrinking, so publishers have to be very mindful of those they choose to work with.

Publishing. Is. Not. For. The. Faint. Of. Heart. Tattoo this on your forehead. It’s a huge investment of time and money, and no publisher with any juice blithely accepts a new title. They do P&L statements, they talk to their sales teams, they take every precaution they can to stack the deck in their favor. And they consider the Author Platform.

I’ve gotten to where I classify Author Platforms into two groups: Done It and Gonna Do It.

Gonna Do It

These are authors whose platforms consist of things they’re gonna do.

  • I plan on getting involved in speaking engagements at ________ (fill in various venues/groups)
  • I plan on promoting my book through social media.
  • I plan on contacting _________ (insert famous name here)

The problem with these is that they’re in the future. Nothing has been established now. No steps are being taken now. Intentions are lovely, but they take time to establish, so it’s foolhardy for an acquiring editor to put faith in things that haven’t happened yet, because you know what? They may not ever happen. Seen it. Pinky swear.

Done It

This group has already taken steps to establish their Author Platform. They’ve already spoken at those events or are intrinsically involved in those groups. They have a strong social media presence in their field of expertise, and they’ve already contacted those Big Mouth names who can lend a cover blurb or review.

Editors want the Done It group.

I have seen so many great stories fall into the Great Abyss because the authors simply weren’t prepared for the amount of time and energy it takes to promote their book. It proved too hard, so they gave up. Problem is, their publishers are still humping the book, and it blows when the authors give up, because then we’re fighting an uphill battle. So are you in for the long haul, or are you going to fold your tent when it gets tough? Many people suffer when the author gives up or won’t listen to the publisher’s promo team.

We depend on the author’s footprint to help us establish inroads with readers and media. If your book proposal says “gonna do it,” do you think this communicates strength and ambition to a publisher, who is going to spend tens of thousands? Or are you unprepared?

Don’t be a Gonna Do It. It could be the difference between a contract and a rejection.


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